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One Dimensional Kinematics Notebook Labs


View: Auxilliary Items  ||  Scoring Rubrics


The following items should be in the One Dimensional Kinematics portion of your notebook.  They should be clearly organized and easy to find.  Use an organizational system and label all work. Each lab will be graded separately.  Eight One Dimensional Kinematics lab grades will be entered into the gradebook.  An overall notebook grade will be determined based on your use of the notebook as an organized and effective record-keeping tool which documents your engagement in the learning cycle during classtime.




K1. Speedometer Lab

Question:
What is the speed of my , battery-powered car?

Purpose:
To determine the speed of a , battery-powered car.


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, and a Conclusion. The Data section should include collected data for several trials; column headings should be labeled and units shown. One sample calculation should be shown. Speed values for all the trials (except those which are obvious ) should be averaged; should be indicated as such in the Data section (a is a wholly scientific means of doing so). The Conclusion should respond to the question raised in the Purpose of the lab.






K2. Speedometer Cubed Lab

Question:
What is the speed of an object as determined by a meter stick and a stopwatch, a ticker tape timer and a meter stick and a motion detector? How do the three methods of determining speed compare in terms of their accuracy and precision?

Purpose:
To determine the speed of an object using three different methods and to compare the accuracy and precision of the results of each method.

A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, a Conclusion, and a Discussion of Results. The Data section should include an organized and labeled record of the measurements resulting from each of the three methods of measuring speed – stopwatch and meter stick method, ticker tape and meter stick method, and LabPro motion detector method. Both measured and calculated data should be listed; work should be shown. The Conclusion/Discussion should identify the speed values determined from each method. An error analysis should be performed; the accuracy and precision of each method should be compared; reasons for such conclusions should be explained.




K3. Diagramming Motion Lab

Question:
How do the dot diagrams for different types of motion compare to each other?

Purpose:
To compare and contrast the dot diagrams for three different types of motion: constant speed motion, slowing down motion and speeding up motion.


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, and a Conclusion/Discussion. The Data section should include computer-generated dot diagrams for the three types of motion. Diagrams should be labeled to distinguish between which diagram corresponds to which motion. The Conclusion/Discussion should describe (in words) the diagrams for each type of motion, identifying the distinguishing characteristics of each diagram.





K4. Position-Time Graphs Lab

Question:
How can the following types of motion be described with a position-time graph? (moving in the positive direction versus moving in the negative direction; moving fast versus moving slow; moving with a constant speed versus moving with a gradually changing speed; speeding up versus slowing down; etc.)

Purpose:
To contrast the shape and slope of the position-time graphs for the following types of motion:
  • moving in the + direction versus moving in the - direction
  • moving fast versus moving slow
  • a constant speed motion versus a gradually changing speed
  • a speeding up motion versus a slowing down motion
  • combinations of the above

A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, and a Conclusion/Discussion. The Data section should include one graph for each contrasting set of two motions; axes should be labeled; labels or color coding or some other method should be used to distinguish between the two motions. The Conclusion/Discussion section should provide a thorough discussion of the differences in the position-time graphs for the variety of motions under study.





K5. Interpreting the Slope Lab

Question:
How does the slope of the line on a position-time graph compare to the speed of an object?

Purpose:
To compare the speed of an object to the slope of the line on a position-time graph.


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, a Conclusion and a Discussion of Results. The Data Section should include the appropriate measurements, graphical display and calculations which are required to accomplish the purpose of the lab; all data should be properly labeled and organized. Work for calculations should be shown. The Conclusion should respond to the purpose of the lab. The Discussion of Results section should describe the evidence which leads to the conclusion statement; specific information which serves as evidence should be identified and elaborated upon. A percent difference calculation is shown.






K6. Velocity-Time Graphs Lab


Question:
How can the following types of motion be described with a velocity-time graph? (moving in the positive direction versus moving in the negative direction; moving fast versus moving slow; moving with a constant speed versus moving with a gradually changing speed; speeding up versus slowing down; etc.)

Purpose:
To contrast the shape and slope of the velocity-time graphs for the following types of motion:
  • moving in the + direction versus moving in the - direction
  • moving fast versus moving slow
  • a constant speed motion versus a gradually changing speed
  • a speeding up motion versus a slowing down motion
  • moving in the same direction versus changing directions
  • combinations of the above

A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, a Conclusion and a Discussion of Results. The Data section should include one graph for each contrasting set of two motions; axes should be labeled; labels or color coding or some other method should be used to distinguish between the two motions. The Conclusion/Discussion section should provide a thorough discussion of the differences in the velocity-time graphs for the variety of motions under study.






K7. Match That Graph Lab

Question:
What general principles allow one to transpose a position-time graph into a velocity-time graph (and vice versa)?

Purpose:
To describe the general principles which can guide the process of transposing a position-time graph into a velocity-time graph (and vice versa).


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, and a Conclusion/Discussion of Results. The Data section should include the provided page – completed and taped in. The Conclusion/Discussion should thoroughly describe all principles required to transpose a position-time graph into a velocity-time graph (and vice versa). The discussion should be detailed and elaborate on the principle. The detail should be sufficient enough to allow a novice to read and follow and be successful at transposing a graph.






K8. Two-Stage Rocket Lab

Question:
How do you describe the motion of a two-stage rocket?

Purpose:
To conduct a complete conceptual and mathematical analysis of the motion of two-stage rocket including slope and area calculations for the various stages and the no-fuel stage.


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, and a Conclusion/Discussion. The Data section should include a velocity-time graph; strategic coordinates (at the end/beginning of stages, the peak of the trajectory and at the instant it explodes) should be listed on the graph. Coordinate values are used to calculate the slope and areas; work is shown and organized; units are listed. Results of calculations are summarized in the provided table. The Conclusion/Discussion should include a summary of your analysis and a response to the provided post-lab questions.






K9. Free Fall Lab

Question:
How can the acceleration of a free-falling object be described? Is it constant or changing? Is it directed upward or downward? Is there a magnitude that is commonly associated with it?

Purpose:
To describe the acceleration of a free-falling object as being either constant or changing; as being directed upward, downward or both (depending on some other variable); and as having a particular numerical value.


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, a Conclusion and a Discussion of Results. The Data section should include a sketch of the velocity-time graph representing the object's motion. Results of the slope analyses should be organized in a table; an average of all trials (except those which are obvious outliers) should be recorded. Class data should be recorded and labeled as such. The Conclusion should respond to the questions raised in the Purpose of the lab. The Discussion section should include an error analysis.





K10. Dune Buggy Challenge Lab

Question:
At what location must a moving car be located in order for a dropped marble to land in its seat?

Purpose:
To determine the distance out from a drop location where a cart must be located in order for a dropped ball to land in the cart.


A complete lab write-up includes a Title, a Purpose, a Data section, and a Discussion of Results. The Data section should include an informative diagram of the physical situation; measured data (or symbols for customary quantities) should be recorded and labeled (with unit) on the diagram. An organized solution to the presented challenge should be shown and labeled; each step of the solution should be briefly annotated. The Discussion of Results should simply identify whether you successfully met the challenge. In the event that you were unsuccessful, you should identify and discuss possible sources of error.






K11. Opening Questions and your Use of a Notebook as a Record-Keeping Tool

Your course notebook is a record-keeping tool. You record information from class which can be used when doing homework and preparing for quizzes and tests. An organized and well-documented notebook typically serves as a useful and effective tool which a student can make much use of. Such a notebook includes notes from class post-lab discussions, book readings, and answers/discussions of opening questions. The information is recorded in the notebook in an organized manner which the student can understand upon review.



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